Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Home About us Ahead Of Print Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact e-Alerts Editorial Board Login 
Users Online:1044
  Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 


 
Table of Contents   
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 532-535
Left behind radiographs in an emergency setting of a tertiary care centre in India: Time to rethink


Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Web Publication3-Jun-2014
 

   Abstract 

Context: The problem of left behind radiological investigations is encountered round the world, which adds to the wastage of resources. Aims: This article attempts to highlights the problem of left behind conventional radiographs in an emergency setting in a tertiary care center of northern India. Settings and Design: Tertiary care center, retrospective study. Materials and Methods: The number of radiographs left behind in the emergency over a period of 14 months was retrospectively assessed. The radiographs were classified as normal, abnormal and technically poor. The technically poor radiographs included the ones with poor centering, inadequate inspiration and improper exposure factors limiting the interpretation. Statistical Analysis Used: Discrete categorical data is presented as n (%). Results: A total of 2783 radiographs were left behind. The total cost of these left out radiographs worked out to 139,150 Indian rupees. Of the 2783 radiographs, 1108 had positive findings (39.8%) and 1399 were normal (50.2%). The technically poor radiographs were 276 (10%) and no definite conclusion could be given as no clinical history was provided in the majority of these cases. Conclusions: A joint cost-effective strategy should be formulated by hospital administration, radiology and allied departments to overcome the problem of ever increasing bundles of left out radiography, especially in the developing countries having resource-poor settings.

Keywords: Emergency, left, limited, radiographs, resources

How to cite this article:
Yadav MK, Bhatia A, Saxena AK, Khandelwal N. Left behind radiographs in an emergency setting of a tertiary care centre in India: Time to rethink. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2013;6:532-5

How to cite this URL:
Yadav MK, Bhatia A, Saxena AK, Khandelwal N. Left behind radiographs in an emergency setting of a tertiary care centre in India: Time to rethink. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Sep 22];6:532-5. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2013/6/5/532/133709

   Introduction Top


The number of radiological investigations is increasing in an exponential fashion around the world. Of these, conventional radiography is commonly used as an initial screening modality due to its easy availability, rapidity and the cost effectiveness. Patients presenting to the emergency department with medical or surgical complaints usually undergo conventional radiography of the region concerned for appropriate course of action. However, many of these are not collected by the patients resulting in a significant burden in terms of availability of space. The cost involved implications on further management, medicolegal importance and storage nuisance are significant. This problem is of great magnitude especially in the developing countries with resource-poor settings and should be appropriately addressed. This study was conducted to quantify the problem of left behind radiographs in an emergency setting.


   Materials and Methods Top


This was a retrospective study conducted in the emergency radiography section of a tertiary care center of the Northern India. Our hospital has 1948 beds, of which 208 beds are in the different medical and surgical observation wards. The emergency radiography section of our department handles the medical and surgical emergency out-patient departments, medical and surgical emergency wards, intensive care units (ICUs), trauma, bedside radiography and all in-patient wards (on an emergency basis). The films are issued to the patients as early as possible. Picture archiving and communications system (PACS) is not fully functional in our set up at present.

The number of radiographs that had been left behind by the patients between September 2010 and October 2011 were retrospectively assessed. The radiographs were classified as normal, abnormal and technically poor. The technically poor radiographs included the ones with poor centering, inadequate inspiration and improper exposure factors limiting the interpretation.


   Results Top


A total of 96,033 radiographs were done in the emergency radiography section during the study period.

[Table 1] summarizes data of the left behind radiographs categorized according to the different wards.
Table 1: Distribution of the left behind radiographs

Click here to view


A total of 2783 radiographs were left behind. The total cost of these left out radiographs worked out to 139,150 Indian rupees.

Of the 2783 radiographs, 1108 had positive findings (39.8%) and 1399 were normal (50.2%). The technically poor radiographs were 276 (10%) and no definite conclusion could be given as no clinical history was provided in the majority of these cases.

Of all the radiographs left behind, maximum radiographs were from the different surgical wards accounting for 695 of 2783 radiographs (24.9%). Of these 695 radiographs, 275 radiographs were abnormal (39.6%).

[Figure 1] and [Figure 2] summarize the distribution of the radiographs by clubbing up of the different wards. The emergency medical included the emergency medicine out-patient department and emergency medicine ward. The emergency surgical out-patient department, emergency surgery wards, trauma wards and operation theatres were clubbed up under emergency surgical category. The rest category included the left out documented wards.
Figure 1: Pie diagram showing the left out radiographs (n = 2783) after clubbing the wards

Click here to view
Figure 2: Bar chart showing the categorized left out radiographs (n = 2783) from different wards

Click here to view


The patients in the emergency surgical wards are usually the post-operative patients who have undergone emergency surgeries (in our center) including the head injuries, abdominal trauma or the referred cases from outside with eventful post-operative period due to complications, which occurred during the surgeries. The left behind radiographs (505 of 2783) from these emergency surgical wards were maximum (18.1%), of which 216 were abnormal (42.8%).

The bed side radiography is done on an extremely urgent basis in ICUs, operation theaters, emergency medical and surgical wards as the patients are bed ridden, on various life supports and cannot be shifted to the radiography room. These left out portable radiographs accounted to be 663 of 2783 (23.8%). Of these 663 radiographs, 66 radiographs were technically poor (10%). The technically poor radiographs from ICUs were maximum in number, 33 of 218 (15%), among the wards mentioned in the requisition forms. In the left over radiographs from ICUs, 126 (46.3%) radiographs were normal.


   Discussion Top


The problem of left behind radiological investigations is encountered by the radiological departments round the globe and is increasing with an increase in number of different imaging modalities.

Plain radiography is used as a screening modality in most of patients presenting to clinical departments, especially in an emergency setting. A study dealing with assessment of left out conventional radiography only in an emergency set up in a tertiary care center has not been documented before in the literature. However, two studies have been documented which evaluated the problem of left out investigations including radiographs, ultrasounds, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in different combinations. [1],[2]

Govindswamy et al. [2] analyzed the total radiographs left behind in the department while we focused on the emergency department only. In their study, 1424 radiographs were left behind of which 658 (46.2%) were normal and 766 (53.8%) were abnormal. In our study however, left out normal radiographs were more than the abnormal radiographs. In the study conducted by Govindswamy et al., [2] maximum abnormal radiographs were from the orthopedics department (510/658, 77.5%), while in our study were from the emergency surgical wards (131/1108, 11.8%). The left abnormal orthopedic radiographs including the poor quality radiographs accounted to a small number in our study (53/1384, 3.8%). This could just be a chance variation. However, the likely cause for the low proportion of poor quality radiographs could be the use of high quality digital radiography system available in our emergency radiography section.

In our study, only in the emergency section itself, 2783 radiographs were left behind. If the data are extrapolated to include the left out non-emergency radiographs as well as other investigations, the total financial burden is of enormous magnitude. This is likely due to a large number of patients handled by our center. This data supports the statement that the problem of left behind radiographs is larger than anticipated when one looks on a larger scale. [2]

There are many problems faced by patients, physicians, radiology department as well the hospital administration due to left out radiographs.

Patients, in our setting, are shifted toward or are discharged from the emergency depending upon the clinical situation. In case, radiograph is not collected by the patient, he might have to undergo the study again (even if previous study might have been normal) in view of non-availability of record after he has left emergency. This again increases the radiation exposure and cost to the patient as well as wastage of time of the patient, referring physician as well as the technologist. Due to non-availability of previously done radiograph, physician at times is not able to assess the progression of the disease as well as faces difficulty in framing a probable diagnosis and its differentials. These left out radiographs require storage space, which is always a constraint for any department.

The radiographs are done free of cost for the first 24 h for patients who have presented for the first time to our center in emergency section. The cost is entirely borne by the hospital administration and government. This fact is not realized and could be one of the possible reasons that few of the patients fail to collect radiographs because the cost initially is not borne by them.

Few of the patients ask about the result immediately at the end of the study. The knowledge of the result could be one of the reasons of their failure in collecting the radiograph, especially in cases of normal studies. The lack of awareness and the discomfort level in a large hospital faced by patients coming for the first time could possibly be another reason.

The hospital administration, radiology and the various referring departments should formulate a strategy to overcome the problem of ever increasing bundles of left out radiography, especially done on an emergency basis.

The requisition should be made for only those cases, in which the clinician thinks that the conventional radiography would actually help him out as a problem solving tool.

The referring clinician should look into the fact that the patient has collected the radiograph as early as possible. This is extremely important in case where significant findings are there. The patients should be educated about the hazards of radiation and importance of collecting previous study for future course of action.

The referring clinician should also pay a little more attention in completely filling the forms (in particular the referral ward) to make the communication easier, especially in case of significant findings.

Left behind technically poor radiographs are mostly the ones done on a portable machine. The patients are bed ridden and it is difficult to achieve a satisfactory position as well as adequate inspiration, especially in chest radiography. This problem can be tackled again by requesting for only those in which the radiograph would actually be cost-effective from the management point of view.

PACS is not fully functional in our set up. The introduction of PACS connecting the radiology and the other departments might be helpful. PACS is fruitful and cost-effective in a tertiary care center handling a lot many patients. The Clinician would then look into the image at the earliest and ask for the printing only if he feels it would be of benefit for future management. However, even if the study is normal, the film can be printed using high resolution laser printers on plain paper. This will reduce the film cost as well as require less storage space. [3] Further, wireless local area networking for linking a personal computer reporting system and PACS have been shown to be clinically feasible in emergency reporting. [4]

However, the transition from traditional film images to PACS is a challenging and often difficult path, [5] especially in resource poor settings.


   Conclusion Top


The problem of the left behind radiographs can be lessened by the joint venture of hospital administration, radiology and allied departments. In case of non-availability of the previously done left out radiograph, repeating the skiagram adds to the cost as well as the radiation exposure to the patient. These left out radiographs require storage space, which is always a constraint for any department. The normal radiographs can be printed using high resolution laser printers on plain paper. This will reduce the film cost as well as require less storage space. Through PACS, clinician can look into the image at the earliest and ask for the printing only if he feels it would be of benefit for future management.

 
   References Top

1.Göktan C, Pekindil G, Orgüç S, Tunçyürek O, Bayindir P, Oner M. CT and MRI examinations left behind in the radiology department. Diagn Interv Radiol 2007;13:173-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Govindswamy GA, Gopinath SM, Kumar AA. Left behind radiological investigations: An inherent problem. Indian J Radiol Imaging 2011;21:236-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
3.Ibbott GS, Zhang Y, Mohiuddin M, Adams E. Reproduction of radiologic images on plain paper. Radiographics 1998;18:755-60.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Yoshihiro A, Nakata N, Harada J, Tada S. Wireless local area networking for linking a PC reporting system and PACS: Clinical feasibility in emergency reporting. Radiographics 2002;22:721-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Rosset A, Ratib O, Geissbuhler A, Vallée JP. Integration of a multimedia teaching and reference database in a PACS environment. Radiographics 2002;22:1567-77.  Back to cited text no. 5
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Mukesh K. Yadav
Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.133709

Rights and Permissions


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]



 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *


    Abstract
   Introduction
    Materials and Me...
   Results
   Discussion
   Conclusion
    References
    Article Figures
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1165    
    Printed40    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded18    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal