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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 72
What do mothers feed their neonates? A report from a rural community in Thai-Cambodia border area


Department of Public Health Curriculum, Surin Rajabhat University, Surin, Thailand

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Date of Web Publication25-May-2015
 

How to cite this article:
Kaewla W, Wiwanitkit V. What do mothers feed their neonates? A report from a rural community in Thai-Cambodia border area. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2015;8:72

How to cite this URL:
Kaewla W, Wiwanitkit V. What do mothers feed their neonates? A report from a rural community in Thai-Cambodia border area. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Sep 23];8:72. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2015/8/3/72/157637
Dear Sir,

In neonatology, an important concern is neonatal feeding. The maternal practice of feeding of the neonates is an important factor determining the nutritional and health status of the neonates. [1],[2] The problem of neonatal feeding can be seen elsewhere around the world and the problem is usually serious in remote communities in the developing countries. Here, the authors report a field survey in a rural community in the Thai-Cambodia border area. The area is a subdistrict, namely, Ban Ku Phreah Rama in Surin province, Thailand. The survey shows that the mothers feed their neonates maternal breast milk in 60% of cases, liquid food supplementation in 20% of cases, powdered milk in 12% cases, and other solid food in 8% of cases. Focusing on the cases who reported using maternal breast milk, only 50% stated exclusive breast feeding for 6 months. In fact, the intent to breastfeed is an important issue to be determined for proper planning for neonatal nutritional management. [3] As noted by Bulatao et al., "maternal health programme effort in developing countries is seriously deficient, particularly in rural areas." [1] Bulatoa et al. noted that "counselling on breast feeding" should be given when the problem is identified. [1] In our report, the problem of neonatal feeding is still seen at a high rate. The rate of proper feeding is low, which is similar to that observed in remote areas of Uganda. [4] A good plan urgently needs neonatal nutrition to be managed in this area.

 
   References Top

1.
Bulatao RA, Ross JA. Rating maternal and neonatal health services in developing countries. Bull World Health Organ 2002;80:721-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Brewster D. Neonatology in the developing world. Part 1. Trop Doct 1989;19:100-4 contd.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Wiwanitkit V. Breast feeding intent and early challenges after caesarean childbirth. Midwifery 2014;30:e166.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Waiswa P, Peterson S, Tomson G, Pariyo GW. Poor newborn care practices - a population based survey in eastern Uganda. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2010;10:9.  Back to cited text no. 4
    

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Correspondence Address:
Dr. Wasana Kaewla
Department of Public Health Curriculum, Surin Rajabhat University, Surin
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.157637

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