Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Home About us Ahead Of Print Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact e-Alerts Editorial Board Login 
Users Online:2826
  Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 


 
Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 76
Neurocysticercosis and microbleed


1 Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Hainan Medical University, Hainan, China

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Web Publication25-May-2015
 

How to cite this article:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Neurocysticercosis and microbleed. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2015;8:76

How to cite this URL:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Neurocysticercosis and microbleed. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Aug 25];8:76. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2015/8/3/76/157645
Dear Sir,

Neurocysticercosis is an important tropical neurological parasitosis. The disease is reported worldwide, and it is very interesting. Normally it is a chronic silent infestation until the occurrence of neurological symptoms, and the imaging investigation usually provides the first clue for diagnosis. However, it is sometimes difficult to make a differential diagnosis of the infection. The situation involving "neurocysticercosis and microbleed" is very interesting. Del Brutto et al. concluded that "calcified cysticercotic lesions should be included in the list of microbleed mimics" and that "CT should be performed in doubtful cases to avoid overdiagnosis of cerebral microbleeds." [1] In fact, the use of imaging might be helpful for distinguishing between neurocysticercosis and microbleed. However, additional investigation, such as the immunological test, should be made to confirm the diagnosis of cysticercosis. In addition, bleeding can also be the a complication of neurocysticercosis, [2] hence, the co-occurrence of the two conditions in the same subject should not be overlooked. Finally, apart from calcified microbleed, other differential diagnoses for calcified neurocysticercosis include tuberculosis and metastasis. [3]

 
   References Top

1.
Del Brutto OH, Lama J, Zambrano M, Del Brutto VJ. Neurocysticercosis is a neglected microbleed mimic. A cautionary note for stroke neurologists. Eur Neurol 2014;72:306-8.   Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Viola GM, White AC Jr, Serpa JA. Hemorrhagic cerebrovascular events and neurocysticercosis: A case report and review of the literature. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2011;84:402-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Graña L, Santamaría N, Yus M, Méndez R. Calcified cerebral metastasis. Radiologia 2007;49:335-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Dr. Beuy Joob
Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok
Thailand
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.157645

Rights and Permissions




 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *


    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed727    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded13    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal