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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1377-1378
How can we respond to the challenge of insufficient physical activity?


Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

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Date of Web Publication6-Nov-2017
 

How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. How can we respond to the challenge of insufficient physical activity?. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:1377-8

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. How can we respond to the challenge of insufficient physical activity?. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 10];10:1377-8. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2017/10/5/1377/196636


Dear Sir,

Physical activity has been associated with health benefits when performed with either moderate or vigorous intensity, while shortage in physical activity has been acknowledged as one of the top 10 risk parameters for deaths globally.[1] Further, regular and adequate levels of physical activity have been associated with improvement in muscular and cardiorespiratory fitness, better bone health, reduction in the risk of various morbidities, and is even important for maintaining an energy balance and weight control.[1],[2]

In fact, the current figures suggest that 25% of the adults and four-fifth of the adolescents are insufficiently physically active, and these are massive estimates, especially because of the rising trend of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and obesity.[1],[3] Further, these estimates of physical inactivity were significantly higher among men and women of the high-income nations, in contrast to that of low-income nations.[1] The rise in physical inactivity has been attributed to inaction during leisure time, sedentary lifestyles at workplace or home, use of passive modes of transport, and urbanization-related environmental determinants (viz., high-density traffic, air pollution, shortage of parks–jogging tracks, sports, recreation facilities, etc.).[2],[3],[4]

Not only that, different motivating factors like stakeholders (family members, neighbors, strangers, peers, health staff, employers, etc.), gyms, media and social media, cultural norms, and the physical environment also influence a person decision to initiate or sustain physical activities for longer period of time.[2],[5]

Realizing the importance of physical activity on different dimensions of health and in the causation of various morbidities, it has been decided to achieve a target of reduction of insufficient physical activity by 10% till the year 2025.[1],[6] Further, comprehensive policies comprising of multiple strategies like fostering linkage with relevant sectors to promote physical activity through activities of daily living, encouraging active modes of transportation and making them accessible and safe, formulating an action plan to facilitate physical activity at workplace, ensuring that schools have adequate infrastructure and space to enable students to actively spend their free time, implementing measures in school settings to inculcate healthy behavior among school children, providing opportunities for everyone to participate in different physical activities, and so on have been developed.[3],[4],[6]

The good thing is that such policy has been developed in four-fifth of the World Health Organization member states, but it is really alarming that it is functional in less than 60% of the nations.[1] Moreover, to address the amount of physical activity for different individuals, specific recommendations have been released for children and adolescents in 5-17 years age group, adults in 18-64 years age group, and elderly aged 65 years and above in terms of minimum duration of physical activity each day and the intensity of the same.[1],[6] In addition, there is a definitive need to improve the surveillance and monitoring of interventions to encourage physical activity.[1],[2]

To conclude, physical activity remains a crucial predisposing factor for multiple non-communicable diseases, and in an attempt to meet the proposed targets, actions are needed at global, national, and local levels to increase physical activity.

Acknowledgement

SRS contributed in the conception or design of the work, drafting of the work, approval of the final version of the manuscript, and agreed for all aspects of the work.

PSS contributed in the literature review, revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, approval of the final version of the manuscript, and agreed for all aspects of the work.

JR contributed in revising the draft, approval of the final version of the manuscript, and agreed for all aspects of the work.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
World Health Organization. Physical activity-Fact sheet No 385; 2015. Available from: http://who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs385/en/. [Last accessed June 17 2016].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Emdadi S, Hazavehei SM, Soltanian A, Bashirian S, Moghadam RH. Physical activity status and related factors among middle-aged women in west of Iran, Hamadan: A cross-sectional study. Glob J Health Sci 2016;8:52166.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Lanier JB, Bury DC, Richardson SW. Diet and physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention. Am Fam Physician 2016;93:919-24.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.
Gontarev S, Kalac R, Ameti V, Redjepi A. Factors associated with physical activity among Macedonian adolescents in Albanian ethnic community. Iran J Public Health 2016;45:474-84.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Keegan R, Middleton G, Henderson H, Girling M. Auditing the socio-environmental determinants of motivation towards physical activity or sedentariness in work-aged adults: a qualitative study. BMC Public Health 2016;16:438.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    
6.
World Health Organization. Global recommendations on physical activity for health. 2010; Geneva WHO press 1-27.  Back to cited text no. 6
    

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Correspondence Address:
Saurabh R Shrivastava
3rd Floor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai Village, Thiruporur, Guduvanchery Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.196636

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