Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 59--64

Human cytomegalovirus infection in Nigerians living with human immunodeficiency virus


Olaoluwa P Akinwale1, Babatunde Afilaka2, V Pam Gyang1, Monsuru A Adeleke1, Adeniyi Adeneye1, Dan Onwujekwe3, Fatimah Alimi4, David O Akande1 
1 Public Health Division, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Yaba, Lagos State, Nigeria
2 Stony Brook University School of Medicine (SUNY), New York, USA
3 Clinical Sciences Division, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Yaba, Lagos State, Nigeria
4 Al-Nuri Specialist Hospital, Surulere, Lagos State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Olaoluwa P Akinwale
Molecular Parasitology Research Laboratory, Public Health Division, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, P.M.B. 2013, Yaba, Lagos State
Nigeria

Context : Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients are at higher risk for Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Aim: To identify HCMV and HIV co-infection among Nigerian patients for prompt therapeutic interventions. Materials and Methods: The study drew samples from the antiretroviral clinic of Nigerian Institute of Medical Research and patients«SQ» informed consent was taken at enrollment. Variables collected included socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, occupation, marital status, educational status, income, and religion, while health-related variables were CD4 counts and HIV viral load. Genomic DNA from whole blood samples of 236 patients, 164 (69.5%) females and 72 (30.5%) males, was subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 2 genes within conserved immediate early (IE) and late (LA) transcribed regions of HCMV genome. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Sciences was used to determine frequencies of HMCV infection, while Chi square was used to examine associations between patient«SQ»s characteristics and HMCV infection. Results: A total of 35 (14.8%) patients; 25 (10.6%) females and 10 (4.2%) males were positive for HCMV infection. Although there was variation in prevalence of HCMV in different marital status, it was statistically insignificant (P = 0.734; P > 0.05). Results also showed that 22 (62.9%) of HCMV positive patients had HIV viral load greater than 10,000, prevalence of HCMV decreased as CD4 counts increased, while 12 (34.3%) of HCMV positive patients had CD4 counts between 1 and 200. Conclusions: This study is the first molecular survey of HCMV/HIV co-infection in Nigeria and has provided valuable information for prompt therapeutic intervention to reduce morbidity among HIV patients.


How to cite this article:
Akinwale OP, Afilaka B, Gyang V P, Adeleke MA, Adeneye A, Onwujekwe D, Alimi F, Akande DO. Human cytomegalovirus infection in Nigerians living with human immunodeficiency virus.Ann Trop Med Public Health 2013;6:59-64


How to cite this URL:
Akinwale OP, Afilaka B, Gyang V P, Adeleke MA, Adeneye A, Onwujekwe D, Alimi F, Akande DO. Human cytomegalovirus infection in Nigerians living with human immunodeficiency virus. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Aug 9 ];6:59-64
Available from: http://www.atmph.org/article.asp?issn=1755-6783;year=2013;volume=6;issue=1;spage=59;epage=64;aulast=Akinwale;type=0