Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 684--685

Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Iranian patients and it's serotyping distribution in order to prevent the infection with suitable vaccine


Ali Mehrabi Tavana 
 Health Management Research Center, Baqiyatallah (A.S) University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Ali Mehrabi Tavana
Health Management Research Center, Baqiyatallah (A.S) University of Medical Sciences, Tehran
Iran




How to cite this article:
Tavana AM. Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Iranian patients and it's serotyping distribution in order to prevent the infection with suitable vaccine.Ann Trop Med Public Health 2013;6:684-685


How to cite this URL:
Tavana AM. Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Iranian patients and it's serotyping distribution in order to prevent the infection with suitable vaccine. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Jun 7 ];6:684-685
Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2013/6/6/684/140269


Full Text

Dear Sir,

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a versatile human pathogen causing infectious disease ranging from mild infection (i.e. otitis media) to life therating pneumonia and meningitidis in many countries. [1] The research reports that, 92 capsular serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae differ greatly in nasopharyngeal carriage prevalence, invasiveness, and disease incidence. [2] Therefore, there has been some necessitate, though, regarding whether serotype independently affects the outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). A total of 135 patients infected samples suspected of invasive streptococcal disease (IPD) were subjected to PCR and bacteriological methods. Out of which, 115 strains of S. pneumoniae was isolated and confirmed by PCR method. The results of this study showed some S. pneumoniae serotypes were found in both sexes and some only in one sex invasive infections. For example, serotypes 10, 14, 18 and 22 were only in female patients with infections. While serotypes 20 were only isolated from men infected. [7] The analysis of the results had suggested that serotypes 6 and 19 are the most abundant bacterial strains isolated from patients. Our data is different from other area research. For example, some studies were shown that, the serotypes 1 and 5 were commonly causing IPD. [3],[4],[5],[6],[7] Hence, the only vaccine that is able coverage serotypes our country is the 23- valent vaccine.

References

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2Weinberger DM, Harboe ZB, Sanders EA, Ndiritu M, Klugman KP, Ruckinger S, et al. Association of serotype with risk of death due to pneumococcal pneumonia: A meta-analysis. Clin Infect Dis 2010;51:692-9.
3Brueggemann AB, Peto TE, Crook DW, Butler JC, Kristinsson KG, Spratt BG. Temporal and geographic stability of the serogroup-specific invasive disease potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children. J Infect Dis 2004;190:1203-11.
4Sleeman KL, Griffiths D, Shackley F, Diggle L, Gupta S, Mariden MC, et al. Capsular serotype-specific attack rates and duration of carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in a population of children. J Infect Dis 2006;194:682-8.
5Scott JA, Hall AJ, Hannington A, Edwards R, Mwarumba S, Lowe D, et al. Serotype distribution and prevalence of resistance to benzyl penicillin in three representative populations of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from the coast of Kenya. Clin Infect Dis 1998;27:1442-50.
6Laval CB, de Andrade AL, Pimenta FC, de Anderade JG, de Oliveria RM, Silva SA, et al. Serotypes of carriage and invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Brazilian children in the era of pneumococcal vaccines. Clin Microbiol Infect 2006;12:50-5.
7Ali Mehrabi Tavana, and Ramazan Ali Ataee. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD) Serotype Frequency in Iranian Patients. Iran Red Crescent Med J. Aug 2013;15:740-2.www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3918202.