Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 469--470

Health implications of some precepts from Buddhist eight precepts: A religious public health concept


Viroj Wiwanitkit 
 Surin Rajabhat University, Surin, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Viroj Wiwanitkit
Surin Rajabhat University, Surin
Thailand




How to cite this article:
Wiwanitkit V. Health implications of some precepts from Buddhist eight precepts: A religious public health concept.Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:469-470


How to cite this URL:
Wiwanitkit V. Health implications of some precepts from Buddhist eight precepts: A religious public health concept. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 14 ];10:469-470
Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2017/10/2/469/208690


Full Text

Dear Sir,

As an ancient science of life, several ancient concepts, especially for religious practice, can be useful for health. The religious concept can be useful in public health.[1] Here, the author discusses the important concepts of Buddhism, precepts, which are the basic rule for any Buddhist around the world. Focusing on the basic common eight precepts, some precepts can be proved for usefulness in medicine and have public health impact. The first one is “the third percept: I undertake to abstain from sexual activity (or I undertake the training rule to avoid sexual misconduct in five precepts).” This can be the best way for control of the sexually transmitted disease. The “abstinence until marriage” is the concept that is widely accepted at present.[2] The second one is “the fifth percept: I undertake to abstain from using intoxicating drinks and drugs, which lead to carelessness.” This is the best example of concordant concept with the present medical concept.[3] It is no doubt that avoidance of alcoholic drinking is the basic present public health principle. The third one is “the sixth percept: I undertake to abstain from eating at the wrong time (the right time is after sunrise, before noon).” This is concordant with previous reports that the patients with good diabetes control usually had only two meals per day.[4] Indeed, the previous report by Wiwanitkit also confirmed for low prevalence of diabetes among Buddhist monks.[5]

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Conflicts of interest

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References

1Ellison CG, Levin JS. The religion-health connection: Evidence, theory, and future directions. Health Educ Behav 1998;25:700-20.
2Santelli JS, Speizer IS, Edelstein ZR. Abstinence promotion under PEPFAR: The shifting focus of HIV prevention for youth. Glob Public Health 2013;8:1-12.
3Seitz HK, Pöschl G. Alcohol and the liver. Ther Umsch 2000;57:227-31.
4de Alba Garcia JG, Rocha AL, Lopez I, Baer RD, Dressler W, Weller SC. “Diabetes is my companion”: Lifestyle and self-management among good and poor control Mexican diabetic patients. Soc Sci Med 2007;64:2223-35.
5Wiwanitkit V. A note from a study on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a sample of vegetarians. Diabetol Croat 2007;36:11-3.