Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Home About us Ahead Of Print Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact e-Alerts Editorial Board Login 
Users Online:493
  Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 


 
Table of Contents   
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 313-316
Correlation of human papilloma virus presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix by immunohistochemistry


1 Department of Pathology, SN Medical College and Associated Hospitals, Agra, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Pathology, SN Medical College and Associated Hospitals, Agra, India
3 Department of Pathology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi, India

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Web Publication8-Oct-2012
 

   Abstract 

Background : Cancer of cervix is the most common form of cancer in females of developing countries. Cervical cancer is the best example of common human malignancy with a proven infectious etiology. The data linking human papilloma virus (HPV) infection with the epidemiology and pathogenesis of cervical neoplasia is convincing. There are various methods for detection of HPV like immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, liquid phase hybridization (hybrid capture test), in situ hybridization etc. Materials and Methods: We studied the profile of precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix and correlated human papilloma virus (HPV) presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix by immunohistochemistry. Total 50 cases were first studied, analyzed, and classified histologically and then immunohistochemistry was done. Results : Majority of the cases 36/50 (72%) under study are squamous cell carcinomas, which is the most common carcinoma found in the uterine cervix. HPV positivity for all cases of cervical carcinoma was found to be 34.7% (16/46 cases), for carcinoma in situ, it was 50% (2/4 cases). It can be thus hypothesized that with decreasing differentiation, there is loss of expression of HPV in the cervical epithelial cells. Conclusion: To conclude, though this study confirms the correlation of HPV presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix, it also suggests that there must be other co-factors involved in cervical carcinogenesis as well.

Keywords: Carcinoma cervix, human papilloma virus, precancerous lesions of cervix

How to cite this article:
Pujani M, Singh K, Pujani M. Correlation of human papilloma virus presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix by immunohistochemistry. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2012;5:313-6

How to cite this URL:
Pujani M, Singh K, Pujani M. Correlation of human papilloma virus presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix by immunohistochemistry. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2012 [cited 2018 Aug 18];5:313-6. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2012/5/4/313/102033

   Introduction Top


Cancer of cervix is the most common form of cancer in females of developing countries and is the second most common cancer, ranking after breast cancer in females of developed world. [1] Cervical cancer is the most common cancer of female genital tract in India with approximately 1,00,000 (one lakh) new cases occurring each year. This accounts for almost 20% of all new cases diagnosed in the world annually. [2]

Cervical cancer is the best example of common human malignancy with a proven infectious etiology. [3] The data linking human papilloma virus (HPV) infection with the epidemiology and pathogenesis of cervical neoplasia is convincing. In humans, 85 types of papilloma viruses have been characterized and fully sequenced and more than 120 putative novel types have been partially characterized. [4]

Approximately 40 different types infect the epithelium of anogenital tract. Papilloma virus are epitheliotropic viruses that predominantly infect skin and mucous membrane and produce epithelial proliferation at the site of infection. [5] HPV infection of cervix falls into two groups. HPV types 6, 11, 31, and 35 are associated with condyloma acuminata and low grade CIN, which does not progress and is only rarely associated with invasive cancers. This group has been termed BENIGN HPV. HPV types 16, 18, and 33 are associated with flat condylomata, low grade CIN that progresses, high grade CIN, and invasive carcinoma, the so called MALIGNANT HPV.

Various methods available for detection of HPV include immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, liquid phase hybridization (hybrid capture test), in situ hybridization etc.

We studied the profile of precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix and correlated human papilloma virus (HPV) presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix by immunohistochemistry.


   Materials and Methods Top


The biopsy material for this study was obtained from patients of cervical cancer/squamous intraepithelial lesion admitted in Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics and Department of Radiotherapy, S.N Medical College, Agra. Tissue sections were obtained from these biopsy specimens in the histopathology laboratory of our department. A total of 50 cases were included in the study. The distribution is shown in [Table 1].
Table 1: Distribution of cases of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions according to histological type

Click here to view


3-5 micrometer sections of 10% neutral buffered formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human cervical biopsy tissue samples were obtained. These were mounted on silanized/ polylysine coated slides. The sections were dried for 16 hrs at 37 0 C, followed by 1 hour at 60 0 C. Heat-induced epitope retrieval using microwave oven was used for antigen retrieval. HPV immunostaining was applied using ready-to-use polyclonal rabbit anti-papilloma virus antibody by DAKO. Primary antibody was Polyclonal Rabbit Anti-Papillomavirus (ready to use preparation - No dilution required) by DAKO. Detection system used was Dakocytomation Envision TM + System- HRP Labelled Polymer. It uses a mouse/rabbit/murine-derived anti-Papilloma-virus antibody to react with major capsid antigen of HPV, particularly L 1. The gene L 1 is predominantly expressed in nuclei of koilocytes because its expression is limited to differentiated cells. [6]

The antibody was directed against L 1 capsid protein; therefore, nuclear positivity was taken to be positive. Cytoplasmic positivity, however, intense was considered negative.


   Results Top


Total 50 cases were studied, analyzed, and classified histologically. Majority of the cases 36/50 (72%) under study were squamous cell carcinomas, which is the most common carcinoma found in the uterine cervix. 4/50 (8%) of high grade dysplastia (HSIL/ CINIII/Ca-in-situ) were also taken to cover the spectrum of lesions from precancerous to cancerous end. Apart from this, 7 cases of adenocarcinoma, 2 cases of adenosquamous carcinoma, and 1 rare case of transitional cell carcinoma were also included. Majority of the cases of cervical cancer, both squamous and adenocarcinomous, were in 41-60 years age group interval.

HPV positivity for all cases of cervical carcinoma was found to be 34.7% (16/46 cases), for carcinoma in situ, it was 50% (2/4 cases) [Table 2]. Overall, HPV positivity for all 50 cases of precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix was found out to be 32% (16/50 cases). Chi-square test was applied on the above-mentioned observations. It was found that P value > 0.05 and degrees of freedom = 4.
Table 2: Percentage positivity for hpv in all cases of precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix

Click here to view


Overall, about 30% of all squamous cell carcinomas were found to be positive, out of which, large cell non-keratinizing type contributes nearly half of the cases (46.15%); adenocarninoma cervix cases have shown over 70% positivity for HPV by immunostaining.


   Discussion Top


In our study, overall 34.7% of all cases of cervical carcinomas were positive for HPV immunostaining, 30% of all squamous cell carcinomas showed positivity for HPV. This compares fairly well with the positivity rate of 25% for squamous cell carcinoma reported by Sheperd et al[7] who detected types 6, 16, and 18 using type-restricted monoclonal antibodies raised against fusion protein representing L 1 major capsid protein. Our results are also comparable with the study conducted by Ravazoula et al[8] for immunohistochemical detection of HPV protein in cervical cancer who reported a positivity of 31%.

In the present study, HPV immunostaining showed a positive result for only 34.7% cases of cervical cancer. Hence, not all cases of cervical cancer show HPV expression, suggesting that though HPV plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis, there must be many other co-factors involved as well. We observed that half of the cases belonging to small cell non-keratinizing group of squamous cell carcinoma were positive for HPV (50%). About 36% of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and 14% of large cell keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma were positive for HPV.

In our study, 50% of the cases of high grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion (Ca-in-situ) were found to be positive for HPV by immunohistochemistry. This can be compared with the results of the study conducted by the Heopfner et al[9] for immunohistochemical detection of HPV, in which he reported a positivity of 50% for cervical dysplasia and 69% for Ca-in-situ. Another study conducted by Gupta et al[10] on paired papanicolaou-stained cervicovaginal smear and histologic sections of cases of genital condylomas (using immunoperoxidase methods) revealed 67% nuclear positivity in cervical smear and 62% nuclear positivity in tissue sections of same cases.

The higher positivity in pre-invasive lesions of cervix (50%) in comparison to diagnosed cases of carcinoma cervix (34%) could be explained by the fact that L 1 gene is predominantly expressed in the nuclei of koilocytes, and its expression is limited to more differentiated cells. [6] So, it can be hypothesized that with progression from precancerous to cancerous state (i.e. loss of differentiation), there is relative decrease of L 1 capsid protein expression.

In a case-control study of 436 women with cervical cancer and 387 control women enrolled in Columbia and Spain, Bosch et al, (1992) found that HPV DNA was the single strongest risk factor for the development of cervical cancer (odds ratio-23.8). [11] Bosch et al[12] in an international study of over 1000 invasive cancers collected in 22 countries showed that HPV DNA was detectable in 93% cases using PCR-based method to examine frozen tissue specimens. HPV 16 was positive in 54% cases, HPV 18 in 15% cases, and HPV 31, 46 in 24% cases.

In a case-control study by Chichareon et al,[13] from Thailand, the fraction of risk attributable to HPV in one population was 95% for invasive squamous cancers of cervix. In a study of colposcopically-negative high risk, women enrolled from STD clinics in New York city.

Fiedler et al,[14] studied the expression of high risk HPV types 18 and 45 E 7 oncoprotein in cervical carcinoma biopsies by immunohistochemistry. Anti-HPV 18 E 7 protein polyclonal antibodies stained all tumor cells but not adjacent connective tissues. These findings suggest that high risk E 7 oncoprotein of HPV 16, 18, and 45 are expressed continuously in cervical cancers and are linked in 80% of all cervical cancers worldwide.

Ravaozoula et al,[8] studied immunohistochemical detection of HPV protein and c erb B2 receptors in cervical lesion specimens from females. 75 cases of CIN and invasive cancer were examined and stained. C erb B2 receptors were found to be positive in 11.7% cases. HPV protein was detected in 31% cases. Koilocytes were seen in 64% cases.

It can be thus hypothesized that with decreasing differentiation, there is loss of expression of HPV in the cervical epithelial cells. To conclude, though this study confirms the correlation of HPV presence with precancerous and cancerous lesions of uterine cervix, it also suggests that there must be other co-factors involved in cervical carcinogenesis as well.

 
   References Top

1.Park K. Epidemiology of Chronic non communicable diseases and conditions. In Text book of preventive and social medicine 16 th ed. Banarsi Das Bhanot publishers; 2000. p. 271-301.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Ghim SJ, Basu PS, Jenson A. Cervical cancer: Etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and future vaccines. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2002;3:2007- 14.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.Stoler MH. Advances in cervical screening technology. Mod Pathol 2000;13:275-84.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.Zur Hausen H. Papillomaviruses causing cancer: Evasion from host cell control in early events in carcinogenesis. J Natal Cancer Inst 2000;92:690-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.Howley PM. Papilloma viridae and their replication. In: Fields BN, Kniepe DM, editors. Fundamental virology, New York: Raven press; 1991. p. 743-70.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Bibbo M, Bergeron C, Ferenczy A. Molecular Techniques: In Comprehensive Cytopathology. 2 nd ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders company; 1997. p. 1075-83.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.Sheperd P, Lunny D, Brooks R, Palmner T, McCance D. The detection of human papillomaviruses in cervical biopsies by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Scand J Immunol Suppl 1992;11:69-74.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.Ravazoula P, Androutsopoulos G, Koumoundouroul D, Michail G, Kourounis G. Immunohistochemical detection of HPV proteins and c-erbB receptors in cervical lesion specimens from young women. Eur J Gynaecol Oncol 2006;27:69-72.  Back to cited text no. 8
[PUBMED]    
9.Hoepfner I, Loning T. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of cervical lesions detected by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Cancer Detect Prev 1986;9:293-301.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.Gupta JW, Gupta PK, Shah KV, Kelly DP. Distribution of human papillomavirus antigen in cervicovaginal smears and cervical tissues Int J Gynecol Pathol 1983;2:160-70.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.Bosch FX, Muñoz N, de Sanjosé S, Izarzugaza I, Gili M, Viladiu P, et al. Risk factors for cervical cancer in Columbia and Spain. Int J Cancer 1992;52:750-8.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.Bosch FX, Manos MM, Muñoz N, Sherman M, Jansen AM, Peto J, et al. Prevalence of HPV in cervical cancer: A world wide perspective. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995;87:796-802.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.Chichareon S, Herrero R, Muñoz N, Bosch FX, Jacobs MV, Deacon J, et al. Risk factor for cervical cancer in Thailand: A case control study, J Natl Cancer Inst 1998;90:50-7.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.Fiedler M, Ressler S, Campo-Fernández B, Laich A, Jansen L, Widschwendter A, et al. Expression of the high-risk human papillomavirus type 18 and 45 E7 oncoproteins in cervical carcinoma biopsies. J Gen Virol 2005;86:3235-41.  Back to cited text no. 14
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Mukta Pujani
Department of Pathology, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi - 110 001
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.102033

Rights and Permissions



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *


    Abstract
   Introduction
    Materials and Me...
   Results
   Discussion
    References
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1381    
    Printed90    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded12    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal