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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1199-1204

Radiographic lumbar spondylosis: Gender and age group prevalence in Nigeria


Department of Radiology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
O Okpala Francis
Department of Radiology, Federal Teaching Hospital, P. M. B 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ATMPH.ATMPH_442_16

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Background: Lumbar spondylosis (LS) increases with, and is perhaps an inevitable concomitant of age, and is a major cause of low back pain and disability in the elderly. The prevalence in Nigeria is poorly documented, and its knowledge will assist in patient management. Objective: The aim is to study the gender and age group prevalence of LS in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of 368 anteroposterior and lateral lumbosacral spine spondylotic radiographs of patients of both genders. Data analysis was performed with IBM SPSS Statistics 20.0 (New York, USA). The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The age range was 17–90 years, mean (standard deviation) was 51.96 (13.49) years. The majority (201 [55%]) were aged 45–64 years. The males (217 [59%]) were aged 17–90 years, and the mean (standard deviation) was 52.28 (14.49) years, whereas the females (151 [41%]) were aged 17–80 years, and the mean (standard deviation) was 51.51 (11.95) years. The mean ages showed no significant gender difference (P = 0.429). Male: female ratio was 1.4:1. LS prevalence increased with age, peaked at 45–54 years in females, 55–64 years in males, and steadily declined to zero, in females after 80 years, and in males after 90 years. Conclusion: LS prevalence started as early as 17 years of life, increased with age, peaked at 45–54 years in females, 55–64 years in males, and steadily declined to zero, in females after 80 years, and in males after 90 years. Sex ratio showed slight male preponderance.


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