Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 511-513

Acute abdomen by gossypiboma


1 Department of Pathology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India
2 Department of Surgery, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India

Correspondence Address:
Monika Garg
Department of Pathology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak - 124 001, Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.105147

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Retained foreign bodies after surgery is a quite rare condition, which can have medico-legal consequences. Foreign bodies forgotten in the abdomen include towels, artery forceps, pieces of broken instruments or irrigation sets, and rubber tubes. The most common surgically retained foreign body is the laparotomy sponge. Such materials cause foreign body reaction in the surrounding tissue. The complications caused by these foreign bodies are well known, but cases are rarely published because of medico-legal implications. We report a case of 41-year-old female who was admitted with complaints of intestinal obstruction who had a previous history of hysterectomy performed 2 months back, at another hospital. Pathologists must be aware of this entity and its proper reporting, as the cases are liable to go to court. Surgeons must recognize the risk factors that lead to a gossypiboma and take measures to prevent it.


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