Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 513-518

Prevalence of acute respiratory infections (ari) and their determinants in under five children in urban and rural areas of Kancheepuram district, South India


Department of Community Medicine, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Kumaresan Kuppusamy
Department of Community Medicine, Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Melmaruvathur - 603 319, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.133700

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Background: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a major public health problem worldwide. It is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and main reason for utilization of health services among children. Identification and intervention of major risk factors can reduce the burden of ARI among children. Objective: To determine the prevalence of ARI and its risk factors among under five children in urban and rural areas of Kancheepuram district, South India. Materials and Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was done in urban and rural field practice areas of Melmaruvathur Adhiparasakthi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research (MAPIMS), Melmaruvathur, Kancheepuram (District) Tamil Nadu, south India, during the period of October 2009-February 2010, covering a study population of 500 under five children. Descriptive statistics was done and chi-square was used as test of significance. Results : Overall, prevalence of ARI was found to be 27%. ARI was noticed more among low social class (79.3%), illiterate mothers (37.8%), those living in kutcha houses (52.6%), overcrowded houses (63.7%), use of smoky fuel for cooking (67.4%), inadequate cross ventilation (70.4%), history of parental smoking (55.6%), low birth weight children (54.8%), and malnourished children (57.8%). Rural children (62.2%) were more affected than urban children. Conclusion: The present study had identified low socioeconomic status, poor housing conditions, cooking fuel used, birth weight, and nutritional status as important determinants for ARI. Interventions to improve these modifiable risk factors can significantly reduce the ARI burden among children.


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