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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 301-302
Dengue in a patient with underlying polycythemia: The first global case report


1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Hainan Medical University, China

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Date of Web Publication28-Jun-2016
 

How to cite this article:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Dengue in a patient with underlying polycythemia: The first global case report. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2016;9:301-2

How to cite this URL:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Dengue in a patient with underlying polycythemia: The first global case report. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Aug 18];9:301-2. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2016/9/4/301/184806
Dear Sir,

Dengue is an important tropical arbovirus infection. It can be seen in several tropical countries. The disease is an acute febrile illness with hemorrhagic complications. Thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration are common.[1] Here, the authors present a case of dengue in a patient with underlying polycythemia. The patient is a 47-year-old male, who presented to the physician with acute febrile illness. On admission, the complete blood count showed slight thrombocytopenia (platelet count = 90,000) and severe hemoconcentration (hematocrit = 54%). This case was finally diagnosed for dengue and successfully treated with rehydration. The history taking showed underlying polycythemia due to obstructive sleep apnea (the underlying hematocrit of the patient is 51%). The nonproportional increased hematocrit and decreased platelet count in this dengue case is proposed to be due to underlying polycythemia. As best as we know, this might be the first global case report on dengue in a patient with underlying polycythemia. Indeed, combined dengue and other hematological problems usually result in aberrant complete blood count picture. The nonproportional increased hematocrit and decreased platelet count can be seen in the case with thalassemia as well.[2]

Acknowledgement

This work is supported by the research fund of Surindra Rajabhat University, Thailand.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Wiwanitkit V. Dengue fever: Diagnosis and treatment. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 2010;8:841-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chuansumrit A. Thalassaemia and dengue virus infection. Paediatr Int Child Health 2013;33:1-2.  Back to cited text no. 2
    

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Correspondence Address:
Beuy Joob
Medical Academic Center, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.184806

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