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LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 408
Rubella seroprevalence in laboratory differential diagnosis for suspicious dengue patients during an outbreak


1 KMT Primary Care Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Joseph Ayobabalola University, Nigeria

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Date of Web Publication14-Nov-2016
 

How to cite this article:
Yasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Rubella seroprevalence in laboratory differential diagnosis for suspicious dengue patients during an outbreak. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2016;9:408

How to cite this URL:
Yasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Rubella seroprevalence in laboratory differential diagnosis for suspicious dengue patients during an outbreak. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2016 [cited 2017 Jul 27];9:408. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2016/9/6/408/193942
Dear Sir,

Dengue outbreak is a common public health problem seen in the tropical world annually. The key factor for success in management of an outbreak is early diagnosis and treatment as well as prevention of further infection. However, difficulty is faced in the diagnosis of dengue. There are several similar tropical infections that can mimic dengue.[1] Good examples are measles and rubella.[2],[3] Here, the authors share the experience on rubella seroprevalence in laboratory differential diagnosis for suspicious dengue patients during an outbreak. Overall 154 patients suspected for dengue infection (acute febrile illness, skin rash, and thrombocytopenia) were investigated for both dengue and rubella serology tests. Focusing on the results, the details of serology results are shown in [Table 1]. There is no concurrent seropositivity. Based on the observation, the seroprevalence rates of positivity for rubella immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are equal to 1.3% and 96.8%, respectively. Based on this work, it can be seen that there are some cases of rubella that might mimic dengue. During an outbreak, if there is no diagnostic tool, a misdiagnosis can be possible. In fact, rubella can present with acute febrile illness. The thrombocytopenia, which is the common clinical feature in dengue, can also be seen in rubella. In a recent report by Tucci et al.,[3] thrombocytopenia can be seen in 30% or patients with rubella.
Table 1: Serological results

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   References Top

1.
Wiwanitkit V. Dengue fever: Diagnosis and treatment. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 2010;8:841-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Pull L, Brichler S, Bouchaud O, Siriez JY. Differential diagnosis of dengue fever: Beware of measles! J Travel Med 2012;19:268-71.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Tucci PL, Tucci F, Peruzzi PF. The behaviour of platelets in some viral infectious diseases in childhood (author's transl)] Ann Sclavo 1980;22:431-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

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Correspondence Address:
Sora Yasri
KMT Primary Care Center, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.193942

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