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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 154-159

Psychosocial risk factors and clinical profile associated with attempted suicide in young adult and adolescent patients in conflict zone-Kashmir


Govt Psychiatric Disease Hospital, Govt Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mohd Muzzafar Jan
Govt. Psychiatric Disease Hospital, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.205561

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Background: Several efforts have been made in the past to study psychosocial risk factors and clinical profile associated with attempted suicide, but only few have addressed the issues of youth in a conflict area Kashmir. Aims: To study psychosocial risk factors and clinical profile associated with attempted suicide in young adult and adolescent patients in conflict zone-Kashmir. Material and Method: It was a hospital-based study in which 200 young adults and adolescent patients who were admitted following unsuccessful suicide attempts to the emergency and referred to Department of Psychiatry, Govt. Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Selected patients were subjected to Mini International Neuropsychiatric interview (MINI) and International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) for evaluation of symptoms and diagnosis. Subjects of age less than 15 years and more than 34 years have been excluded. Results: Majority of the suicide attempters 65% were < 24 years of age with adolescent over represented in the sample (Mean = 21.24 ± 4.66), females were 58%, low socioeconomic status (86%), oral agents (most common method) was used by 84%, 64% had expressed suicidal or death wishes before act and 72% made an impulsive attempt. Eighty-two percent of the suicide attempters were suffering from some psychiatric illness at that time. Out of which 40% had mood disorder with predominance of major depressive disorder, 15% had personality disorders, and 9% had posttraumatic stress disorder. Conclusion: Knowledge of clinical phenomenology may assist in identification and early intervention of youth who are at high risk. Overall, findings indicate a strong and immediate relationship between suicide attempt and psychiatry morbidity.


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