Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 993-998

Which factors predict metabolic syndrome? A cross sectional study in Kermanshah, Iran


1 Research Centre for Environmental Determinacies of Health, School of Public Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences; Nutritional Science Department, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
2 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
3 Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
4 Department of Occupational Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
5 Research Centre for Environmental Determinacies of Health, School of Public Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
6 Nutritional Science Department, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Lida Hagh Nazari
Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ATMPH.ATMPH_308_17

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Background: Lifestyle and food pattern play a key role in the creation and control of metabolic syndrome (MS). Objective: The present study was conducted to determine the role of nutritional and anthropometric factors as the predictors of MS in food production and distribution business owners. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 112 food retailers selected in a random fashion. The study questionnaires included the demographic information questionnaire and food frequency questionnaire. The body composition was measured using the body analyzer. To examine lipid profiles and blood sugar, 5 ml fasting blood samples were taken from the participants. The data were analyzed using the logistic regression test. Results: The present study found high waist–hip ratio and body fat mass to be the strongest anthropometric predictors of MS. High lean body mass and total body water were negatively correlated with and played a protective role in MS. Consumption of dairy products as a food group was negatively correlated with MS, i.e., the higher the consumption, the lower the emergence rate of MS. The prevalence of MS was found to be 30.4% in the over 40 age group, 51.4% in 40–49 years old and 61.3% in those aged 50 and above, suggesting a positive correlation between the prevalence of MS and increasing age (P = 0.02). Conclusion: The present study found increased waist circumference and reduced dairy consumption to increase the risk of MS. Furthermore, weight reduction changes in lifestyle by increasing physical activities and observing proper diets were found to significantly decrease the risk of MS.


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