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Table of Contents   
EDITORIAL COMMENTARY  
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1105-1106
Young people acting as ambassadors for the accomplishment of women-related sustainable development goals


Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

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Date of Web Publication6-Nov-2017
 

How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Young people acting as ambassadors for the accomplishment of women-related sustainable development goals. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:1105-6

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Young people acting as ambassadors for the accomplishment of women-related sustainable development goals. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 12];10:1105-6. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2017/10/5/1105/217532


Dear Editor,

Sustainable development goals, especially the ones related to health, aim to improve the health standards of the general population from all walks of life irrespective of the settings.[1] These goals are formulated in such a way as to accomplish universal health coverage, equality, and prevent violation of basic rights, especially of the vulnerable population groups.[1] Further, it provides an opportunity for the policy makers and the governments show their commitment toward the upliftment of the society and ensure that young people have a better future.[1],[2]

The population group of women and girls has often attracted attention from the global stakeholders owing to their position in the male-dominant society in different settings, and the vulnerability they have been exposed to in different stages of their lives.[2] Thus, special emphasis has been given to achieve gender equality and their empowerment, by not only targeting elimination of violence (like sexual harassment, violation of rights, etc.) and harmful practices (like child marriage, early childbearing or genital mutilation, unsafe abortion, etc.) but also to improve their literacy status, bringing about a change in the mindset of people, and providing them adequate care and support to have a better knowledge about sexual and reproductive health, regardless of the prevailing situation in the region (like humanitarian emergencies).[1],[2],[3]

Furthermore, any negative impact on women's and girls' health has been associated with significant burden on the health system, delay in the nation's growth, and serious social consequences as well.[2],[3] However, considering the multiple shortcomings at the policy level or with regard to routine welfare measures or even multiple gaps in the healthcare delivery system, especially in low- and middle-income nations, it is not something unexpected that interests of women and girls have not been safeguarded.[1],[2],[3],[4]

Even though program managers have tried to improve the scenario through building policies, not much has been sustained due to the lack of financial support and poor implementation or defects in the monitoring or evaluation of these policies.[1],[2]

Thus, in order to obtain better results, create awareness about sexual and reproductive health, and improve the quality of life, it is quite essential to involve the local communities in different settings.[5] It is not something new that most of the stakeholders (parents, teachers, local leaders, health workers, etc.) are finding it hard to communicate about sexual and reproductive health to the young people or even the women in a socially acceptable way at the right age.[3],[4]

In an attempt to deal with many interlinked issues related to welfare of girls and women, the United Nations Population Fund supported an annual competition in Uganda by giving extra attention to youth empowerment (through the promotion of completion of schooling or getting an appropriate job) and prevention of early pregnancy and child marriage.[5]

In fact, these school students have been considered as ambassadors for the accomplishment of women-related sustainable development goals, and a poem has been developed to cover all the issues related to empowerment of women and to ensure improvement in their health standards.[1],[4],[5] Also, many teachers have been trained about early pregnancy and child marriage and to provide relevant information or referral care for sexual and reproductive health.[4],[5] In addition, in collaboration with the national education ministry, there is a plan to develop culturally acceptable and age-group-specific, comprehensive sexuality education in schools.[5]

To conclude, it is extremely important to address various issues related to women's health and their empowerment in the global mission to achieve sustainable development goals, and young people can play a defining role in accomplishing the proposed targets.

Acknowledgements

SRS contributed in the conception or design of the work, drafting of the work, approval of the final version of the manuscript, and agreed for all aspects of the work.

PSS contributed in the literature review, revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, approval of the final version of the manuscript, and agreed for all aspects of the work.

JR contributed in revising the draft, approval of the final version of the manuscript, and agreed for all aspects of the work.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
García-Moreno C, Amin A. The sustainable development goals, violence and women's and children's health. Bull World Health Organ 2016;94:396-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Amatya A. Focusing on women and children in the sustainable development goals. J Nepal Health Res Counc 2015;13:1-2.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Glasper A. Is the sexual health of children and young people adequately protected? Br J Nurs 2016;25:624-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.
Paul M, Näsström SB, Klingberg-Allvin M, Kiggundu C, Larsson EC. Healthcare providers balancing norms and practice: challenges and opportunities in providing contraceptive counselling to young people in Uganda-a qualitative study. Glob Health Action 2016;9:30283.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
UNFPA. Girls in Uganda become SDG ambassadors, fight teen pregnancy with poetry; 2016. Available from: http://www.unfpa.org/SDG ambassadors [Last accessed on 2016 August 14].  Back to cited text no. 5
    

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Correspondence Address:
Saurabh R Shrivastava
3rd Floor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai Village, Thiruporur, Guduvancherry Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.217532

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