Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1524-1528

Prevalence of the waterborne diseases(diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, and hepatitis A) in West of Iran during 5years(2006–2010)


Research Center for Environmental Determinants of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Kiomars Sharafi
Research Center for Environmental Determinants of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ATMPH.ATMPH_493_17

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Background: Evaluation of the microbial quality of drinking water can prevent the waterborne diseases outbreak that is one of the most important challenges in the world. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal variation of waterborne diseases prevalence associated with the microbial quality of drinking water and the comparison between rural and urban areas in Kangavar city, West of Iran. Materials and Methods: To accomplish this, the results of the microbial quality of drinking water and cases of simple diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, and hepatitis A were received from all rural and urban health centers of the city during 5years (2006–2010). To determine the relationship between diseases and microbial quality of water, correlation instruction, and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used. Results: The results showed that except hepatitis A, the incidence of all diseases in different areas(urban or rural) and seasons had significant relationship with microbial contamination of drinking water(P<0.05). The stronger relationship was observed in rural areas than in urban areas(except simple diarrhea) and in warm seasons than in cold seasons. Conclusion: With respect to the impact of the microbial quality of water on the incidence of dysentery and typhoid diseases, keeping up the quality of drinking water in places and times with high sensitivity(rural areas and warm seasons) should be considered strongly.


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