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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1831
“This death snake bit the patient!”, is it usually venomous after examination ?


1 RVT Medical Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Hainan Medical University, Hainan, China

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Date of Web Publication11-Jan-2018
 

How to cite this article:
Sriwijitalai W, Wiwanitkit V. “This death snake bit the patient!”, is it usually venomous after examination ?. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:1831

How to cite this URL:
Sriwijitalai W, Wiwanitkit V. “This death snake bit the patient!”, is it usually venomous after examination ?. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2017 [cited 2018 Nov 16];10:1831. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2017/10/6/1831/188518


Dear Editor,

Snake bite is common venomous animal bite in the tropics. The patient who gets the bite is usually brought to the emergency room for proper medical care. Sometimes, the patient or the patients' relative brings the death snake sample, which is killed after it bit the patient, for identification. Our setting is a tropical country with a high prevalence of snake bite.[1] Viravan et al.[2] noted that “correct identification of venomous snakes is especially important in Thailand because the locally-produced antivenoms are monospecific.” Here, the authors review the record on examination of 15 death samples, which were brought to the hospital for identification. The results of examinations show that only five out of 15 (33.3%) snakes are venomous (all are green pit viper snakes). It seems that the snake bite in our setting is usually due to nonvenomous snake. This is contrast to the previous report in the past 2 decades.[2]

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There are no conflicts of interest to declare.



 
   References Top

1.
Chanhome L, Cox MJ, Wilde H, Jintakoon P, Chaiyabutr N, Sitprija V. et al. Venomous snakebite in Thailand. I: medically important snakes. Mil Med 1998;163:310-17.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Viravan C, Looareesuwan S, Kosakarn W, Wuthiekanun V, McCarthy CJ, Stimson AF, et al.: A national hospital-based survey of snakes responsible for bites in Thailand. T rans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 1992;86:100-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
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Correspondence Address:
Won Sriwijitalai
Won Sriwijitalai, RVT Medical Center, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.188518

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