Dengue outbreak in an endemic area: Implication from valid percentage of infection in local population versus migrant worker

How to cite this article:
Wiwanitkit S, Wiwanitkit V. Dengue outbreak in an endemic area: Implication from valid percentage of infection in local population versus migrant worker. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2014;7:77

 

How to cite this URL:
Wiwanitkit S, Wiwanitkit V. Dengue outbreak in an endemic area: Implication from valid percentage of infection in local population versus migrant worker. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Mar 7];7:77. Available from: https://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2014/7/1/77/145042

Dear Sir,

Dengue is an important tropical infection that is highly prevalent in Southeast Asia. Thailand, a country in Southeast Asia, has many infectious cases annually.­ [1] In the rainy season of 2013 (June-September), a big outbreak occurred in Thailand affecting many 1000 people. Here, the authors present and discuss on an interesting epidemiological data from an endemic area, Chiangmai province. According to the recent report on August 2013 (http://thainews.prd.go.th/), in 2013, there are overall accumulated 9654 dengue cases in the setting. Of interest, 666 cases from these overall cases are migrant workers from nearby countries (Myanmar and Laos). Of interest, the valid percentage of migrant worker patients is equal to 6.9%. This valid percentage is considerable high and it seems that the migrant worker become a group to be focused in disease control. In fact, the percentage of total migrant worker comparing to local population is lower than 1% (ratio <1:100). However, based on the present observation, comparing between observed valid percentages, the ratio between migrant patients and local people cases is equal to 1:13.5, which implies that the migrant get higher risk to the infection. To successfully control of dengue in the setting, the policy has to focus on control of the disease outbreak in both local people and migrant workers. The special focus on the living area of the migrant is needed. Indeed, the migrant usually live in crowded place and this increased the risk of vector-borne transmission of dengue. Of interest, the focus of disease control for the migrant is usually on the diseases that might be possible carried by the migrant from their hometown. However, the concern on the new disease that they might get in the new setting is usually forgotten. There are few reports on this aspect. It is also mentioned that “manifestations of dengue may be altered when outbreaks involve immunologically naïve adults who have migrated to dengue endemic areas.­ [2]” Nevertheless, in the present situation, the migrant is from the same geographical area and there is no difference in immunological background to dengue.

References

 

1.
Pancharoen C, Kulwichit W, Tantawichien T, Thisyakorn U, Thisyakorn C. Dengue infection: A global concern. J Med Assoc Thai 2002;85 Suppl 1:S25-33.
2.
Seet RC, Ooi EE, Wong HB, Paton NI. An outbreak of primary dengue infection among migrant Chinese workers in Singapore characterized by prominent gastrointestinal symptoms and a high proportion of symptomatic cases. J Clin Virol 2005;33:336-40.

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

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DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.145042

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