Healing Buddha and Buddhism-related natural medicine in the Japanese context: A short note

How to cite this article:
Kaewla W, Wiwanitkit V. Healing Buddha and Buddhism-related natural medicine in the Japanese context: A short note. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2016;9:122

 

How to cite this URL:
Kaewla W, Wiwanitkit V. Healing Buddha and Buddhism-related natural medicine in the Japanese context: A short note. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Aug 10];9:122. Available from: https://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2016/9/2/122/177381

Dear Sir,

One of the rooted public health care systems is the religion-related health care. In East Asia, with a long history, the Buddhism-related natural medicine becomes an important health wisdom. This is as well the rooted wisdom of other nearby areas such as Southeast Asia. In a previous work, we have studied the belief and system of the “Buddha of Healing” in Thailand. [1] Here, the authors (Kaewla et al. and Wiwanitkit et al.) reported an additional finding from a famous East Asian country – Japan. Indeed, Japan has a strong history and the existence of a historical piece of a specific “Yakushi Buddha” which is the Japanese Buddha of healing. [2],[3],[4],[5] Previous reports [2],[3],[4],[5] showed that there were many evidences of natural herbs identified in the Yakushi Buddha. Here, the authors perform a field study in four main cities in Japan, Niigata; Nagano; Inuyama; and Nagoya, surveying 10 local Buddhist temples. Of interest, according to the survey, there is no evidence of the present use of Buddhism-related natural medicine in the surveyed areas. This might reflect that there is already a lack of continuum of Buddhism-related health care within the temples in Japan. Due to further civilization, Japan might have less use of temple care compared to the local practice in Thailand, Southeast Asia. [1]

Acknowledgement

This work is supported by Research Fund, Surin Rajabhat University, 2015.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

 

1.
Kaewla W, Wiwanitkit V. Bhaisajyaguru and medical container in Mahayana Buddhist temple in Eastern Thailand: A public health pharmacological study. Ann Trop Med Pub Health. (In press).
2.
Okuda J, Noro Y, Ito S. Yakushi Buddha (Buddha of Healing) and its medicinal container in Japan. Pharm Hist 1999;41:102-9.
3.
Okuda J, Noro Y, Ito S. Medical pots of Yakushi Buddha in Japan. Rev Hist Pharm (Paris) 2005;53:7-32.
4.
Okuda J. Studies on Yakushi Buddha and its medicinal container. Yakushigaku Zasshi 2014;49:171-5.
5.
Okuda J. Yakushi Nyorai (the Buddha of healing) statue with medicinal pot in Japan. Rev Hist Pharm (Paris) 1996;44(Suppl):497-8.

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

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DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.177381

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